Registration successful!

You are now registered to the All About Eggs Egg-mail Newsletter.

Okay
Loading...
  • That's correct! Click 'next' to go to the next question.
    That's incorrect! Click 'next' to go to the next question.

    Pop Quiz

    Q1.

    Birds, insects, most reptiles, amphibians, some fish and some mammals lay eggs outside of their body.

    Supporting graphic of frog's eggs
    Question 1 of 5
  • That's correct! Click 'next' to go to the next question.
    That's incorrect! Click 'next' to go to the next question.

    Pop Quiz

    Q2.

    Animals that lay eggs outside of their bodies are called ‘oviparous’.

    Supporting graphic of a duck's nest with eggs in it
    Question 2 of 5
  • That's correct! Click 'next' to go to the next question.
    That's incorrect! Click 'next' to go to the next question.

    Pop Quiz

    Q3.

    All animals lay eggs that people can eat.

    Supporting graphic of a child holding a half-eaten chicken egg
    Question 3 of 5
  • That's correct! Click 'next' to go to the next question.
    That's incorrect! Click 'next' to go to the next question.

    Pop Quiz

    Q4.

    Eggs are farmed all over Australia.

    Supporting graphic of chickens at an egg farm
    Question 4 of 5
  • You've finished! Click 'next' to start the next activity.
    That's incorrect! Click 'next' to start the next activity.

    Pop Quiz

    Q5.

    Australian people buy most of their eggs from other countries.

    Supporting graphic of eggs in a carton
    Question 5 of 5
  • Oviparous Animals

    Nearly all animals lay eggs but only some of them lay eggs outside their body. They are called oviparous animals and include:

    Decorative graphic of several birds perched on a branch Birds
    Decorative graphic of a series of insects Insects
    Decorative graphic of a chameleon, a type of reptile Most reptiles
    Decorative graphic of a frog, a type of amphibian Amphibians
    Decorative graphic of a clown fish Some fish
    Decorative graphic of a platypus, an example of an oviparious mammal Some mammals
  • You did it! Click 'next' to go to the next question.

    Do we eat these eggs?

    Drag the animal onto the green tick if we eat their eggs and the red one if we do not.

  • Do we eat these eggs?

    Click on the animal to learn more about their eggs.

    X

    Shark:
    Some fish hold their eggs inside their body, but most species lay eggs outside of their body (oviparous). Fish eggs are soft and have no shell. Some fish lay millions of eggs in one session but only a few eggs hatch to become baby fish. Some bony fish, like sharks, lay eggs and produce very few young.

    X

    Hen:
    All birds lay eggs but their shape, size and colour are different. The ostrich lays eggs which are about 20cm long and weigh 1.6 kg (30 times as much as a hen’s egg). The eggs we eat most often are laid by female chickens, called hens. Hens lay on average one egg every 24-26 hours.

    X

    Butterfly:
    All insects lay their eggs outside of their body (oviparous). Their size and appearance are different. Some butterflies lay one egg at a time, others lay eggs in small clusters, while others lay hundreds at a time. Butterfly eggs come in many shapes and colours. The shapes include spherical, oval, and pod-shaped; the colours include white, green, and yellow.

    X

    Frog:
    Amphibians such as frogs and toads live on land and in water. They lay soft jelly-like eggs, with no shells. The female lays her eggs in water or wet places to protect them from drying out. Some frogs lay as few as 2 eggs at a time. Some lay 50,000 eggs.

    X

    Snake:
    Reptiles are cold-blooded animals and most lay their eggs out of their body (oviparous). Reptile eggs usually feel soft and leathery and they contain a large yolk to provide food to the growing young. Not all snakes lay eggs, but about 70% do. When a female snake lays eggs, she can lay up to 100 at a time.

    X

    Echidna:
    Most mammals keep eggs inside their bodies then give birth to live young, but two species of mammals, the echidna and platypus, are oviparous. They are known as monotremes. The female lays a single soft-shelled, leathery egg and deposits it directly into her pouch. Hatching takes place after 10 days.

  • You did it! Click 'next' to go to the next question.

    Eggs we like to eat

    In Australia, people can buy and eat the eggs of which animals? Clue: some of the eggs can only be bought at a farm!

  • Eggs we like to eat

    The eggs we buy and eat most often come from a hen.

  • You did it! Click 'next' to go to the next question.

    Where are eggs laid in Australia?

    Drag the number of eggs laid in each state, each year.

  • Getting the eggs to you

    Watch the video below on how eggs get to your supermarket.

  • Which part of the world produces the most eggs?

  • That's correct! Click 'next' to go to the next question.
    That's incorrect! Click 'next' to go to the next question.

    Pop Quiz

    Q1.

    Nearly all animals produce eggs. Only some of them lay eggs outside of their body.

    Question 1 of 10
  • That's correct! Click 'next' to go to the next question.
    That's incorrect! Click 'next' to go to the next question.

    Pop Quiz

    Q2.

    Animals that lay eggs outside of their bodies are called 'omnivorous'.

    Question 2 of 10
  • That's correct! Click 'next' to go to the next question.
    That's incorrect! Click 'next' to go to the next question.

    Pop Quiz

    Q3.

    The size and amount of eggs laid by animals are all different.

    Question 3 of 10
  • That's correct! Click 'next' to go to the next question.
    That's incorrect! Click 'next' to go to the next question.

    Pop Quiz

    Q4.

    Hen eggs are the most popular choice of eggs that people eat in Australia.

    Question 4 of 10
  • That's correct! Click 'next' to go to the next question.
    That's incorrect! Click 'next' to go to the next question.

    Pop Quiz

    Q5.

    New South Wales has the highest proportion of egg farming in Australia.

    Question 5 of 10
  • That's correct! Click 'next' to go to the next question.
    That's incorrect! Click 'next' to go to the next question.

    Pop Quiz

    Q6.

    The Northern Territory produces more eggs than Queensland.

    Question 6 of 10
  • That's correct! Click 'next' to go to the next question.
    That's incorrect! Click 'next' to go to the next question.

    Pop Quiz

    Q7.

    The ACT (Australian Capital Territory) does not produce any eggs.

    Question 7 of 10
  • That's correct! Click 'next' to go to the next question.
    That's incorrect! Click 'next' to go to the next question.

    Pop Quiz

    Q8.

    Most of Australia’s eggs are consumed (eaten) by the overseas market.

    Question 8 of 10
  • That's correct! Click 'next' to go to the next question.
    That's incorrect! Click 'next' to go to the next question.

    Pop Quiz

    Q9.

    Asia produces the most eggs of any region.

    Question 9 of 10
  • That's correct! Click 'next' to complete the activity.
    That's incorrect! Click 'next' to complete the activity.

    Pop Quiz

    Q10.

    Australia only produces a small number of eggs compared to the rest of the world.

    Question 10 of 10
  • Congratulations!

    You've completed the lesson!

    For more information on eggs visit www.eggs.org.au
    or click here to choose another Interactive Lesson.

Back

Next